If film grew on trees, I wouldn’t need money.

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I come from the generation where everyone believes they can be a photographer. Despite the talent we may, or may not possess, most of us don’t even know the basics to taking pictures. As the generation that grew up with handy iPhone cameras doing all the work for us, we don’t realise how hard it really was using an old fashioned camera. We have apps that give us film photography filters, but don’t know how to operate one. So why HAS digital photography engulfed film? How did companies like Kodak shut down? Well you can google those questions; I haven’t gotten around to that yet..

Moving from Digital to film?
As a street photographer, the concept of ‘frames per second’ is very important to me. Moments I want to capture depend on the amount of pictures I can take within that second! So how would I do that with a film camera?

The process of taking a picture with a SLR begins with inserting the film by trying not to burn it all. The more film you pull out, the less pictures you get to take on an already limited film. However, once the film is in it doesn’t get any easier. An automatic lock is activated after EVERY – SINGLE – PICTURE. After every photo, you are to pull back the lock and go to the next frame on your film. Just imagine the amount of ‘moments’ you just missed on the street ..

Excuse me while I salute old fashioned street photographers.

#YouMissedASpot, I mean shot.
As someone who takes pictures in extreme situations as those in Pakistan, my camera is then set to auto settings. That doesn’t mean it is doing all the work for me, but rather speeding up the process. If i were to set the setting for each picture each time, i’d be missing a lot. This is not the case with an ‘old fashioned fully manual film camera’. ( Bet you can’t say that in one breath ) .. The name might be pretty self explanatory, but trust me it was tougher than it sounds. Upon shooting every picture, you are to change your shutter speed as well as your focal length unitl that little light meter goes green. Finding the right exposure can be pretty frustrating at times. In other words, you have to keep playing with numbers until you’re good to go. Practice may help however, once you miss the shot, well you’re not getting it again.

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If film grew on trees, I wouldn’t need money.
With film photography, you have to be wise with the way to spend your film. With only 24 pictures on one reel, refilling can be time consuming as well as expensive. As a photographer that started digitally, I have a confession to make. I normally take upto 200 pictures per setting and end up liking a maximum of 10. #Guilty
Good thing I was born in the digital era or i’d be broke. Probably a better photographer, but broke.
Did I mention the developing process? Your pictures don’t just pop up, & no your film doesn’t go into your laptop, but that calls for a blog post on its own.

Find your comfort zone.
Despite the many differences between the two types of photography, I wouldn’t want to call either of them ‘better’.
Each one has its own perks and each one radiates its own excitement. The beauty of film photography, in my opinion, could never compare to that of digital. The natural highlights & colour quality has its own throne. The element of surprise is another treasure, in a day an age where patience is no longer a trait possessed. Learning film photography is a base to being a better photographer. Not only do you learn to appreciate it’s history, but rather you realise what a long way photography has come.
At the end of the day each one is an art in itself; try different mediums until you find yours!

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